Category: L


Learning to be Silent

Learning to be Silent

King Solomon asked an Entered Apprentice, a Fellowcraft, a Master Mason, and a Past Master to retire to a chamber for instructive meditation. They were given orders to sit silently and not to speak.

At evening time, a servant came in to light the lamps, and accidentally spilled some oil.

“Watch out!” cried the Entered Apprentice. “You’re spilling the oil!”

“Shush,” said the Fellowcraft. “We aren’t supposed to talk.”

“Fools,” said the Master Mason. “Why couldn’t you just be quiet?”

“It appears,” said the Past Master, sanctimoniously, “that I am the only one who did not talk.”

A Discourse Among Masters

A Discourse Among Masters

Once in ancient times, the Master of a lodge called all his neighboring Worshipful Masters together for discourse on the highest truth. Once they had arrived, he stood and spoke: “Welcome, dear brothers! I have called you all here so that I might explain to you what it means to be brought to light.”

Immediately all the brothers burst into laughter, and for the remainder of the time they sat around telling such jokes and poking fun at each other.

Looking For A Lodge

The Master of the lodge was working in his studio when a young Fellowcraft was brought to him. After offering him refreshment, the Master asked after the young man’s purpose.

“I have been traveling in search of work, and I stopped here when I saw the lodge.”

“How can we be of help, brother?” asked the Master.

“I would like to settle down someplace. Perhaps you can you tell me what the people are like here?”

The Master thought for a moment.  “What are the people like where you are from?” he asked.

The Fellowcraft snorted. “They are a most unpleasant bunch. They carp and complain, and are rarely helpful.”

“I see,” said the Master. “Well, I am afraid that you will find the people to be pretty much the same way here.”

The Fellowcraft nodded. “I expected as much. I thank you for your time.” He then picked up his tools and went on his way.

Some time later, the Master was working in his studio when a second Fellowcraft was brought to him. After offering him refreshment, the Master asked after the second young man’s purpose.

“I have been traveling in search of work, and I stopped here when I saw the lodge.”

“How can we be of help, brother?” asked the Master.

“I would like to settle down someplace. Perhaps you can you tell me what the people are like here?”

The Master thought for a moment. “What are the people like where you are from?” he asked.

The Fellowcraft beamed. “Oh, they are usually pleasant and friendly, and happy to help out a brother.”

“I see,” said the Master. “Well, I believe that you will find people to be pretty much the same way here.”

The second Fellowcraft nodded. “I expected as much,” he replied, “and if you would have me, I would like to join your lodge.”

Listen

Listen

A young Master Mason approached a stoic old Past Master that he highly respected. The Master Mason said: “Brother, if there is anything I have learned from you, it is that too many brothers speak too many words about light and the True Word. To me their speech is like a multitude of veils and crashing symbols that further conceal the bright and quiet wisdom of Masonry.”

“Mmm-hmm,” replied the old Past Master, “but have you never seen the beauty in ten-thousand falling leaves, nor heard the strength in the many-rivulet crescendo of a rushing waterfall?”

The Laughing Master

There once was a Master Mason that left his lodge to travel and work. He had no desire to teach apprentices or craftsmen. Instead he worked right along side of them, laughing and joking all the while. He was widely known as the Laughing Master.

Another Master Mason heard about him and went to watch him at work on a new shrine. He watched the brother joking and laughing with the apprentices and craftsmen, apparently not taking anything very seriously. Finally, he approached and inquired: “What is the meaning of Masonry?”

The Laughing Master immediately dropped his tools to the ground and stood in silence.

“Then,” asked the other, “what is the actualization of Masonry?”

At once the Laughing Master snatched up his tools and went back to work while joyously fraternizing with the apprentices and craftsmen.

Light in Extension

Over the door of an ancient lodge is carved “Light in Extension”. The letters are unusually artistic, and those who appreciate the art of engraving always admire them as a masterpiece. It is said that a Master Mason drew them on paper, from which the apprentices would trace them onto the stone so that the fellowcraft could then carve them out before the master finished them.

A young apprentice attended the master as he sketched the letters. The apprentice was charged with keeping the quills sharp and ensuring there was plenty of ink and paper. But the apprentice was also a little cocky and often criticized his master’s work. “That’s not very good,” he told the master after his first effort.

“How is this one?”

“Poor. Worse than before,” pronounced the apprentice.

The master patiently wrote one sheet after another until thirty-two copies of “Light in Extension” had accumulated, still without the approval of the apprentice.

Then, when the young man stepped outside for a few moments, the master thought: “Now this is my chance to escape his sharp eye,” and he wrote hurriedly, with a mind free from distraction, “Light in Extension”.

When the apprentice returned he nodded confidently, “Now that is a masterpiece!”